oldbakery23@gmail.com

Heather: +44 7584253231 / Colin: +44 7787355008 / Evening Number: +44 1571844257

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About Us

In October 2015 Heather and Colin Bought this 200+ year old building, the oldest and first built in Lochinver (even before the churches were built). It has been derelict for decades and had no doors, no internal walls, no windows, roof falling down…. A ruin!

 

18 months of hard working and living in a caravan, they single-handedly rebuilt every aspect of this beautiful building.

 

The Old Bakery was re-opened in May 2017 as a guest house.

Historical Importance of The Old Bakery…….

 

MAN CONVICTED OF 1830’S MURDER BY ‘SECOND SIGHT’ WITNESS

 

The hanging of 30 years old Hugh Macleod attracted thousands to the streets of inverness in the 1830’s – but his murder conviction was anything but ordinary, as his trial was the last one ever in Scotland which allowed the old superstition of second sight.

 

Foretelling was still very much alive in the highlands in the 19th century, where this intriguing tale of murder and execution took place.

 

The story unfolds in the 1830’s, in the far north west Sutherland, around Lochinver.

 

Murdoch grant was a pedlar or “packman” who made a decent return on the clothing and goods he brought north from Inverness, selling them on in scattered villages where people had no access to shops.

 

On March 11, there was a large wedding in the township of Assynt.

 

Murdoch Grant attended, and enjoyed a sales boost from many celebrating guests. He set off in the direction of Loch Broom, and was never seen alive again.

 

A month later, his badly decomposed corpse was spotted floating in remote Loch Torr na h-Eiginn.

 

The small community was thrust together in panic and before long, the word “murder” had been spoken.

 

With no policeman near to hand, the villagers turned to the local school master, Hugh Macleod, a dapper figure, promised to raise the authorities from Inverness.

 

Hugh was an only child and was indulged by his parents from an early age.

 

As a teenager, he had developed an appetite for “damsels, dress and drams”.  He regularly visited the pub which is now the dining room in The Old Bakery.

 

By the age of 21, when the death of Grant took place. He had fallen into “Sabbath breaking” and “carousing late”- despite his responsibilities as a school master.

 

Nobody could ignore the fact that following Grants’ Disappearance, Macleod was seen in the Old Bakery pub enjoying something of a windfall and spending lots of money.

 

A man known as “Kenneth the dreamer” declared that he had experienced a vision of Grant’s murder in his sleep after being in the pub The Old Bakery one night when Macleod was in.

 

Macleod was arrested and convicted for the murder of Grant as a result of Kenneth the dreamers statement.

 

Shortly before Macleod was hanged in chains, Hugh Macleod was paraded through the streets of Inverness in front of a jeering crowd of three thousand. He was the only Scottish defendant in history whose trial admitted the evidence of second sight.

 

The Old Bakery played a vital role in this historical story….